Pisgah Family Health

PISGAH FAMILY

HEALTH NEWS

June 2007

OFFICE NEWS

MEDICAL NEWS

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OFFICE NEWS

Ridgefield's Walking Trail is complete

Ridgefield Business Park (our business home) has installed a 1.4 mile off-road trail for recreational walkers and joggers. The trail passes directly in front of our office, and makes a loop around the entire business park. Most of the trail is wooded and covered in mulch. A small segment passes over sidewalks and roads. The trail includes some hills, and is covered in mulch, so walkers should wear sturdy walking shoes. A detailed map is available at our office.

The trail is available at all hours. We hope this will be a resource for our patients interested in maintaining their fitness.

Ridgefield Walking Trail

Office Hours

  • Our normal office hours are 9-5 Monday through Thursday, and 9-12 on Friday.
  • We will be closed the entire week of July 4th, from Monday, July 2nd through Friday, July 6th. During this time staff will be answering the phones, but no office visits will be available.
  • We will be closed Friday, August 17th (For our 3rd anniversary staff celebration)
  • When the office is closed, emergency care is available at the Urgent Care Centers, and at Mission/Saint Joseph hospitals ER.  Telephone calls are handled by Dr. Curran’s call partners. Our answering service can be reached after hours at 251-4873.

Office Reminders

Thank you for referring your family and friends to Pisgah Family Health.

Federal Law (HIPAA) prohibits us from releasing any of your information without your written consent. Please let us know if you would like to authorize us to release information to your spouse or a family member.


Medical News - Summer Safety Issue

Play It Safe in the Sun: A Parents' Guide

Warning (16K)

Too Much Sun Hurts

Did you know that just a few serious sunburns can increase your child's risk of skin cancer later in life? Kids don't have to be at the pool, beach, or on vacation to get too much sun. Their skin needs protection from the sun's harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays whenever they're outdoors.

Turning pink? Unprotected skin can be damaged by the sun's UV rays in as little as 15 minutes. Yet it can take up to 12 hours for skin to show the full effect of sun exposure. So, if your child's skin looks "a little pink" today, it may be burned tomorrow morning. To prevent further burning, get your child out of the sun.

Tan? There's no other way to say it-tanned skin is damaged skin. Any change in the color of your child's skin after time outside-whether sunburn or suntan-indicates damage from UV rays.

Cool and cloudy? Children still need protection. UV rays, not the temperature, do the damage. Clouds do not block UV rays, they filter them-and sometimes only slightly.

Oops! Kids often get sunburned when they are outdoors unprotected for longer than expected. Remember to plan ahead, and keep sun protection handy-in your car, bag, or child's backpack. Parents, help your children play it safe in the sun and protect your own skin as well. You're an important role model.


Hey Moms and Dads! Not all sun protection comes in a bottle. Here are five ways to protect your child's skin all year long.
Umbrella 1. Hide and Seek. UV rays are strongest and most harmful during midday, so it's best to plan indoor activities then. If this is not possible, seek shade under a tree, an umbrella or a pop-up tent. Use these options to prevent sunburn, not to seek relief once it's happened.
Shirt 2. Cover 'em Up. Clothing that covers your child's skin helps protect against UV rays. Although a long-sleeved shirt and long pants with a tight weave are best, they aren't always practical. A T-shirt, long shorts or a beach cover-up are good choices, too-but it's wise to double up on protection by applying sunscreen or keeping your child in the shade when possible.
Hat 3. Get a Hat. Hats that shade the face, scalp, ears, and neck are easy to use and give great protection. Baseball caps are popular among kids but they don't protect their ears and neck. If your child chooses a cap, be sure to protect exposed areas with sunscreen.
Sunglasses 4. Shades Are Cool. And they protect your child's eyes from UV rays, which can lead to cataracts later in life. Look for sunglasses that wrap around and block as close to 100% of both UVA and UVB rays as possible.
Sunscreen 5. Rub on Sunscreen. Use sunscreen with at least SPF 15 and UVA/UVB protection every time your child goes outside. Choose waterproof sunscreen that is made for kids. Avoid alcohol-based sunscreens (Bullfrog) which may burn the skin. Reapply sunscreen every 2-3 hours (or better yet, go inside!) Don't forget to protect ears, noses, lips, and the tops of feet.

Outdoor Food Safety

Summertime is a great time to enjoy the outdoors with a cookout or picnic. Unfortunately, not all foods remain safe at outdoor temperatures. Outdoor water supplies may also pose a hazzard. To avoid contaminated foods and water, here are a few safety tips.

General Rules for Outdoor Food Safety

  • Pack safely: use a cooler, or pack foods in the frozen state with a cold source when hiking or backpacking.
    • Keep raw foods separate from other foods.
    • Never bring meat or poultry products without a cold source to keep them safe.
  • Protect yourself and your family by washing your hands before and after handling food.
  • Bring liquid hand sanitizer, disposable wipes or biodegradable soap for hand and dishwashing.
  • Bring bottled or tap water for drinking. Otherwise, boil water or use water purification tablets.
  • Leftover food is only safe if the cooler still has ice in it. Otherwise, discard leftovers.
  • Do not leave trash in the wild or throw it off your boat.

Keep Everything Clean

  • Always wash your hands before and after handling food, and don't use the same platter and utensils for raw and cooked meat and poultry.
  • If you are going somewhere where running water is not available, bring water with you. Or pack liquid hand sanitizer.
  • Bacteria present on raw meat and poultry products can be easily spread to other foods by juices dripping from packages, hands, or utensils.
  • When transporting raw meat or poultry, double wrap or place the packages in plastic bags to prevent juices from the raw product from dripping on other foods.

Cook Thoroughly

  • Fresh and frozen raw meat, poultry and fish should be cooked hot enough to kill the bacteria, parasites and viruses that may be in the product.
  • Always use a meat thermometer to check temperatures.
  • Color is not a reliable indicator of doneness.

Safe internal temperatures for meats:

  • Whole poultry 180°F
  • Chicken breasts 170°F
  • Ground turkey and poultry 165°F
  • Ground beef hamburgers 160°F
  • All cuts of pork 160°F
  • Beef, veal, lamb steaks, roasts and chops 160°F **
  • All other meat and fish 160°F

Safe Drinking Water

  • It is not a good idea to drink water from a lake or stream, no matter how clean it appears.
  • Bring bottled or tap water for drinking.
    • Start out with a full water bottle.
    • Replenish your supply from tested public systems when possible.
  • The surest way to make water safe is to boil it. Boiling will kill microorganisms.
    • Before heating, muddy water should stand for a while to allow the silt to settle to the bottom.
    • Dip the clear water off the top and boil.
    • Bring water to a rolling boil, and then continue boiling for 1 minute.
  • As an alternative to boiling water, you can also use water purification tablets and water filters.
    • The purification tablets kill most waterborne bacteria, viruses, and some parasites.
    • Because some parasites - such as Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia, and larger bacteria - are not killed by purification tablets, you must also use a water filter.
    • These water-filtering devices must be 1 micron absolute or smaller.
    • Over time purification tablets lose their potency, so keep your supply fresh.

Safe Fish-handling

  • Scale, gut, and clean fish as soon as they're caught.
  • Live fish can be kept on stringers or in live wells, as long as they have enough water and enough room to move and breathe.
  • Wrap fish, both whole and cleaned, in water-tight plastic and store on ice.
  • Keep 3 to 4 inches of ice on the bottom of the cooler. Alternate layers of ice and fish.
  • Store cooler out of the sun and cover with a blanket.
  • Once home, eat fresh fish within 1 to 2 days or freeze them.
  • For top quality, use frozen fish within 3 to 6 months.

http://www.health.state.mn.us/foodsafety/away/boatcamp.html

July is Fireworks Safety Month

The Consumer Product Safety Commission and the National Council on Fireworks Safety offer the following safety tips:

  • Always read and follow label directions.
  • Have an adult present.
  • Buy from reliable sellers.
  • Use outdoors only.
  • Always have water handy (a garden hose and a bucket).
  • Never experiment or make your own fireworks.
  • Light only one firework at a time.
  • Never re-light a "dud" firework (wait 15 to 20 minutes and then soak it in a bucket of water).
  • Never give fireworks to small children.
  • If necessary, store fireworks in a cool, dry place.
  • Dispose of fireworks properly by soaking them in water and then disposing of them in your trashcan.
  • Never throw or point fireworks at other people.
  • Never carry fireworks in your pocket.
  • Never shoot fireworks in metal or glass containers.
  • The shooter should always wear eye protection and never have any part of the body over the firework.
  • Stay away from illegal explosives.

http://www.fireworksafety.com

Men's Health Week

June 11-17 (leading up to Father's Day) is National Men's Health Week. The purpose of Men's Health Week is to heighten the awareness of preventable health problems and encourage early detection and treatment of disease among men and boys. Listed below are men's top 5 causes of death, sorted by age. Also listed are the most useful steps you can take for prevention of these and other causes of illness and death.

Men Ages 15-24

Leading Causes of Death

  1. Motor vehicle accidents
  2. Homicide
  3. Suicide
  4. Other accidents
  5. Cancer (all types combined)

Lifestyle Prevention Factors

  • Avoid tobacco use
  • Avoid fast foods and overeating
  • Avoid drug use & alcohol abuse
  • Do not drink and drive
  • Wear safety belts while driving
  • Exercise vigerously for at least 30 minutes most days of the week
  • Practice safe sex

Medical Prevention Factors

  • Physical Exam every 3 years
  • Screening for sexually transmitted infections
  • Screening for testicular cancer
  • Use a multivitamin without iron
  • Tetanus booster every 10 years

Men Ages 25-49

Leading Causes of Death

  1. Cardiovascular diseases
  2. HIV/AIDS
  3. Motor vehicle accidents
  4. Suicide
  5. Cancer (lung, lymphoma, colon)

Lifestyle Prevention Factors

  • Avoid tobacco use
  • Avoid fast foods and overeating
  • Exercise at least 30 minutes most days of the week
  • Limit alcohol to two drinks per day
  • Do not drink and drive
  • Wear safety belts while driving
  • Practice safe sex

Medical Prevention Factors

  • Physical Exam every 1-2 years
  • Cholesterol testing every 5 years
  • Consider an aspirin daily (81 mg)
  • Use a multivitamin without iron
  • Tetanus booster every 10 years

Men Ages 50-64

Leading Causes of Death

  1. Cardiovascular diseases
  2. Cancer (lung, colon, lymphoma)
  3. Accidents
  4. Cirrhosis and liver disease
  5. Diabetes

Lifestyle Prevention Factors

  • Avoid tobacco use
  • Eat a diet low in fat and cholesterol
  • Exercise at least 30 minutes most days of the week
  • Limit alcohol to two drinks per day
  • Do not drink and drive
  • Wear safety belts while driving

Medical Prevention Factors

  • Physical Exam every year
  • Cholesterol testing every 3-5 years
  • Screen for colon cancer
  • Prostate exam and PSA
  • Take an aspirin daily (81mg)
  • Use a multivitamin without iron
  • Tetanus booster every 10 years

Men Ages 65+

Leading Causes of Death

  1. Cardiovascular diseases
  2. COPD (includes emphysema)
  3. Pneumonia and influenza
  4. Lung cancer
  5. Prostate cancer

Lifestyle Prevention Factors

  • Avoid tobacco use
  • Eat a diet low in fat and cholesterol
  • Exercise at least 30 minutes most days of the week
  • Limit alcohol to two drinks per day
  • Do not drink and drive

Medical Prevention Factors

  • Physical Exam every year
  • Annual prostate exam and PSA
  • Cholesterol testing every 3-5 years
  • Screen for colon cancer
  • Take an aspirin daily (81mg)
  • Use a multivitamin without iron
  • Tetanus booster every 10 years
  • Influenza (flu) shot each year
  • Pneumonia (Pneumovax) vaccine

Health Links

For more health information, check out these links:

About our Newsletter

Dr. Curran and the staff at Pisgah Family Health are proud to publish the Pisgah Family Health News to our patients.  Our goal is to provide regularly updated information about the office and current medical topics.  We plan to publish a new issue each quarter with breaking news.  The newsletters will also be archived on our website, http://www.pisgahfamilyhealth.com/

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